Tuesday, February 24, 2009

Environmental and Social Economics

Environmental and Social Economics- I just want to remind artists that are relocating to neighborhoods like East Garfield that this neighborhood has also functioned as a cultural insulator. Within its bosom minority cultures have remained intact, and new ideas have incubated.

We are reminded that urban cycles of decline, decay, and abandonment followed by rebirth through rehabilitation, renovation, and reconstruction may appear to be natural processes. In fact, however, the fall and rise of cities are consequences not only of financial and productive cycles and state fiscal crises but also of deliberated social policy.1

INSTEAD OF DOWN PLAYING THE EXISTENCE OF THE STATE OF THE WEST SIDE, ARTISTS SHOULD RISE UP A COMMUNITY …ADOPT A BLOCK BRINGS POSITIVE CHANGE. PERHAPS THAT SHOULD BE THE ROLE OF INCUBATORS LIKE THE SWITCHING STATION.

So how do you change a city? The answer is block by block! Adopt a block works effectively in other cities and neighborhoods across America and it can work in East Garfield! Whether it’s taking food to the homeless, cleaning the streets, planting flowers, or playing with kids we need to as artists reconstuct nature. http://www.peoplestribune.org/

Homeless today can affect anyone, especially artists. As we witnessed in the Stimulus Bill Government is abandoning artists once again, and the poor, as American’s cities are reorganized around the global economy and corporates profits. Homelessness today is an indictment of the capitalist system, yes artists are being displaced, losing work, losing studio space, and wondering if they should double-up housing.

In today’s economic and political conditions, it is incurable. It results form the elimination of jobs due to automation, and outright greed. These jobs are gone forever. What can we do? The power of society must be brought to bear to compel the government to house everyone in need. More developments like the "Switching Station Artist Loft", affordable housing, for artists!

If you have something to contribute, contact spirit@Irna.org, [1]
1. "Nature as a icon of Urban Resistance"- Gregory Sholette, afterimage September/October 97
1. "Fragments of a Metropolitan Viewpoint, in If You Lived Here: The City in Art, Theory and Social Activism, Brian Wallis, Seattle: Bay Press, 1991

1 comment:

Dan said...

Alpha, this is a good post. You make the point that artists have been left out of the stimulus package. But NPR reported that the NEA was scheduled to get $150 million: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=99916513